Live Oak Tree Scientific Name

Live Oak Tree Scientific Name

Southern Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)

A large, sprawling, picturesque tree that is highly desirable as a landscape tree. The live oak tree is one of the broadest spreading of the oaks, providing large areas of deep, inviting shade. Reaching 40 to 60 feet in height with a 60 to 100 foot spread and usually possessing many sinuously curved trunks and branches.

The live oak tree is an impressive sight for any large-scaled landscape. Give it plenty of room since the trunk can grow to more than six feet in diameter. An amazingly durable American native tree, it can measure its life in centuries if properly located and cared for in the landscape.

In Texas, live oak trees learned ten thousand years ago that Texas soils and environmental conditions are not conducive for propagation from the acorns. They depend on animals and birds to transplant acorns away from the parent tree for the sake of forest diversity. Live oaks are very bad parents and do not want competition from their siblings, so they predispose a fungus to kill the germination of the acorns that remain under the tree.

Live oaks propagate in a very unusual manner, they put out ramets (sending-up root sprouts) from the mature roots, or otherwise a bud that grows off the root. This method ensures 100% survival as the new shoots have a fully mature root system for support. They actually clone themselves, a Mott or grove of a few or up to hundreds of trees are really all the same tree and can cover large acreage areas.

Live Oak Tree in Texas – An Entertainers Delight

Live Oak Tree in Texas – An Entertainers Delight

Why are live oak trees part of the design for hosting entertainment? It is about creating atmosphere and a wonderful atmosphere is easy under a magnificent tree. To do this you must know the elements that make sense rest, relaxation, elegance, pleasure and organize the elements of landscape design so that everything has a comfortable design and is of interest. The design landscape must create intrigue with the different areas to visit and reflect “the excitement factor”.

Create the mood

What creates a great landscape design environment that keeps your guests entertained, fill their glasses of wine, sweet smell and taste of hoers task. Regardless of the budget and the elements a great landscape design for outdoor entertaining should have multiple uses and activities, be comfortable and beautiful. Although very personal, beautiful landscape design must engage with fountains, sculptures, garden art or trees like your live oak in the foreground with stylish and soft lush fall back hedges and bushes. Pathways various guidance materials and the unification of his guests are one space to another with the intrigue and interest, “what else is here” is the emotion you want to generate. How can you make the most of every element of the garden to create maximum beauty, functionality and usability?

Patios and gardens and plantations

Creating a hierarchy of roads, patios and lawns landscape defines the spaces that have different uses. You can also add details the areas of pavement and concrete. For example, you can create an effect of outdoor carpet by the addition of a mosaic pattern to a patio or yard herringbone brick with white stone edge to add visual interest and detail in the definition of space. You can also change color or material routes transition between the larger spaces such as the use of stone carved with the ground cover planted in the middle to soften the effect of the route and provide greater visual interest and softness with the surrounding garden. Grass can serve as patios open to play with clipped hedges and edges of the garden with seating areas, as in a park public were people love seeing other people.

Pools, spas and water sources

Most of the architectural elements of the pools years have become dynamic features built into the water. Sun decks are common to come and give up the pool. Banks can be built along a length total pool to rest. In the pool, also may be shallow to walk. Water sources can take advantage of vertical add a sculptural element to suck as a large spa that descends into the pool vessel or aircraft may be perfectly woven into the pool for the visual and auditory effects.

The outdoor kitchen

Outdoor kitchens have become multimedia rooms. A beautiful outdoor fireplace can serve as a backdrop for a wonderful night outdoors, serving as the function and art. A simple fire pit can provide all the fun and coordination point that you need in a small courtyard. If built in an area, TV and stereo can add to your grilling enjoyment. There are all sorts of variations on the grid configurations. There are combination of grilling and snuff, and like refrigerators or sinks depending on the amount of cooking you see doing for your guests. Outdoor kitchens also indoor entertainment outdoors.

Seats

Seats have to change from passive to comfortable. This includes passive seating walls and concrete, stone or wooden benches, the areas were your guests can sit or stand against speaking with someone for a short mix of conversation. At the next level that may be able to eat and socialize. Then, more comfortable chair to sit on large family and relaxation.

Landscape lighting

The soft light blue glow of a live oak branch and leaves cascading across a stone bench. The environment of flickering light and water and surface brightness in a pool. Floodlit is really what creates the state mood and sets the tone for the enjoyment of all night. High-voltage mercury vapor lighting emits a soft glow at night surreal creating a new effect complete the landscape design. Hot accent lights can be carefully placed to give interest to the sculptures, urns, bowls of flowers or light up the beauty of a ornamental live oak tree.

Build an outdoor extravaganza

The more you can add the above elements, plus the design of your garden landscape becomes an experience for meetings, events and private renewal. Just as the interior of your home provides different use areas for the garden should reflect its many public and private needs and dreams.

Fun Live Oak Tree Facts

Fun Live Oak Tree Facts

The south comes to mind when one thinks about live oak trees. These classically beautiful trees with Spanish moss draped along streets with historic antebellum homes are unforgettable. Live oaks grow across the Southeastern United States.

They are found on the east coast from southeastern Virginia to Florida and west to southern and central Texas. The live oak tree grows predominantly in sandy soils of low coastal areas but it also grows in dry sandy or moist rich woods. It has a resistance to salty soil and salt spray from the ocean and does well on barrier islands.

Live oak is monoecious. This means that they have separate male and female reproductive units on the same plant. They produce flowers every spring from March through May and the acorns mature in September and fall off by December. Live oak acorns are long, dark brown to black and tapered. They are sweet and very popular with birds, squirrels and other animals. If the acorns fall on moist, warm ground, they will germinate soon after falling.

Live oaks do not get very tall, rarely above 50 feet but the crown or canopy of the tree can have a span of 150 feet. It is a very popular shade tree because of this. The wood of the live oak is very hard and strong and was used years ago for shipbuilding among other various wood making ventures. The wood is not used as widely today as it used to be because it is predominantly a shade and ornamental tree.

Live oaks have a tendency to grow in large, dense groups with interconnected roots systems, this is why you see them sprawling so closely to each other down many small town main streets across the south.

If you are ever in the south near historic Charleston South Carolina, you will be surrounded by history. Once you have soaked up the architectural beauty and rich history of the city, head to nearby John’s Island to see the oldest living thing east of the Rockies. Known as the Angel Oak, the live oak tree that has its own park is estimated to be 1,500 years old, pre-dating Columbus by 1,000 years!

Tucked into a wooded area the Angel Oak tree will simply astound you. Its quiet majesty shades the tiny park it dominates; it will be quite a while before you forget the 160-foot span of Angel Oak’s massive branches. Her circumference is a whopping 25 feet, and she covers 17,000 square feet of ground.

For more facts about the history of Live oaks and general informative information stayed tuned in. For now, I will say see you later, I have a picnic lunch date under a grand, old, shady friend; a live oak tree.

5 Tips For Live Oak Tree Care

5 Tips For Live Oak Tree Care

Oak trees are an iconic and significant symbol throughout history. They represent strength and timelessness. These trees are some of the most magnificent found here on earth. There are even over three hundred varieties of these majestic forest giants throughout the world. Oaks like all living things need to be taken care of. They need five key helpers to keep them thriving day in and day out.

First is fertilizing. In natural or undisturbed conditions, a mature oak tree does not need to be fertilized; however, in a case where planting, up rooting, or nearby ground disturbance has occurred, it is important to administer some fertilizer to the base of the tree. This will help the oak get more comfortable with its new surroundings quicker.

Fertilizer is also necessary for unhealthy trees that may require extra nutrients to survive. Fertilizing an oak will balance the phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen nutrients in which are needed to grow greener richer foliage. Ensuring your tree with enough nutrients to help with the foliage growth will increase the capacity to capture sunlight and produce food and energy.

Soil cover is the second helper to an oak trees survival. In order to avoid erosion or root damage, it is important to maintain a few inches of soil cover over the roots of the tree. This soil cover should extend about six foot from the tree trunk and should not cover the trunk. You do not want the roots to become girdled and wrap around the trunk.

Irrigation is our third helper. Generally, mature oak trees do not require much irrigation, and supplemental watering can create a ripe environment for disease causing pathogens. However, if the tree has been uprooted or transplanted, or even just a little guy, some extra precautions might be good and will help your live oaks thrive.

Pruning is our fourth helping task. While mature oaks do not require any pruning all trees require the occasional dead branch or twigs cleaned off. It is very important to prune younger less mature oaks so that their branches can grow to be strong and the canopies/ foliage can spread to form a grander, wider range of shade. Pruning of the oak tree should really only be done during the dryer seasonal months of the year such as June and July. In addition, do not over prune.

Last but certainly not least is love. Loving your oak tree is the biggest and best help care tip I can give. Oak trees like most need TLC, tender loving care. They will thrive best when cared for properly.

In conclusion, when thinking of adding or simply trying to revitalize an oak, please consider these five simple helpful tips. Enjoy your oaks, and with over 300 varieties there’s bound to be one out there just for you. Me personally, I love the Southern Live Oak tree, and I know my Live Oak tree loves me back.

Experiencing the Live Oak Tree

Experiencing the Live Oak Tree

Each time I walk beneath the magnificent branches of Live Oak trees I feel as if I am being transported back to another time and place. This oak is considered to be a symbol of southern strength. Many oaks you see lining older southern streets are hundreds of years old.

I am often in awe that such huge magnificent trees are able to stand firmly in such sandy loose Florida soil. They have these huge trunks and gnarly outstretched limbs that look as though they could almost reach out and grab you. Each Live Oak tree is usually draped with lovely Spanish moss that sways gently in the breeze, giving these trees a touch of eeriness.

Fairchild Oak TreeThe oldest Live Oak tree in Florida (pictured here) is thought to be in Ormond Beach, and is located in Bulow Creek State Park. This oak is called the “Fairchild Oak” and is thought to be over 400 years old. The oak has been a silent witness to human activities along Bulow Creek. According to the park this includes the destruction of the nearby Bulow Plantation during the second Seminole War in 1836.

The Live Oak is also one of the best trees to survive hurricane winds. These oaks have been called the most wind-tolerant shade tree in all of Florida. Within three months after Hurricane Charley made landfall in Florida, the Live Oak trees near the coast started re-growing leaves. The Live Oak is also the top shade tree to survive Hurricane Camille, one of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit the United States.

Did you know there is even a “Live Oak Society” for these amazing trees? The Live Oak Society was founded in 1934 by Dr. Edwin Lewis Stephens, the first president of Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now the University of Louisiana in Lafayette). The Society promotes the culture, distribution, preservation and appreciation of the live oak tree, scientifically known as Quercus virginiana.

According to the Live Oak Society the “Seven Sisters Oak”, formerly known as “Doby’s Seven Sisters” is thought to be the oldest Live Oak tree alive. The owner who first named the tree was Carole Hendry Doby, who was one of seven sisters. The “Seven Sisters Oak” is located in the Lewisburg area of Mandeville, Louisiana on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. Estimated by foresters to be 1200 years old, this tree has a girth of over 38 feet. This oak is also the National Champion on the National Register of Big Trees.

Am I Missing A Southern Live Oak Tree?

Am I Missing A Southern Live Oak Tree?

Spring is here, it is time to play, I think I will go out and tend to my garden today. Recently I relocated my family to a new home, a pretty home but not much to look at outside. When the weather started to get warmer I thought to myself about what I could do to make the view out my front windows more appealing to the eye. I started a garden walk along the front, graced it with as many flowering shrubs plants and ornaments as I could to get the look I was longing for. However, something was still missing.

I took the time, I planted and weeded and made my garden look good but it just was not enough. My garden still needed that wow factor. I needed the last piece of the puzzle to make it complete. Then as if some huge bell had dinged,” I got it, I need a tree.” However, not just any tree, a glorious tree! A tree that will not just look great all year round, but a tree that will stand the tests of time.

I searched high and low for the tree in my dreams, the tree that would make my garden complete. The tree I found that was perfect was a beautiful cathedral, southern live oak tree. The southern live oak tree speaks volumes when in a garden or lavish landscape. It says “Hello, look at me, I will make your garden complete.” These live oaks give off a sense of elegance, strength, and longevity wherever they can be seen, which makes it perfect for me. I usually see these towering wonders along the back roads between my new home and our little town covering the roads with there friendly canopies.

Once I had decided that the southern live oak was for me there was no stopping me. I looked and looked for a nursery with live oak trees for sale perfectly suited for me. I happened upon Southern Pride Tree Farm. The name of the nursery sells itself. There they had the most gorgeous 12ft cathedral live oak trees I had ever seen. Their potential for growth and beauty oozed out of them. I chose my tree and soon after had her planted deep with in the earth settled in the center of my garden.

This simple yet majestic southern live oak tree transformed my garden in one fell swoop. Now I can look out my front windows and know that to me, my garden is as perfect as it can be.

The Magnificent Live Oak

The Magnificent Live Oak

The magnificent live oak is a broadleaf evergreen tree known as a picturesque addition to any landscape. Live oak trees are known as the southern symbol of strength. The live oak is also the official state tree of Georgia.

Often seen lining the historic streets of small towns, the reclining branches create a majestic canopy of scattered sparkling light on a summer day. Live oak trees typically grow somewhat rapidly while young and often live to be centuries old. The live oak mainly grows in the lower coastal plains from southeastern Virginia but more commonly in southern Georgia to Florida as well as Texas.

More commonly recognized in the Gulf Coast area, live oaks often support many types of iconic plant life. The most recognizable includes Spanish moss which hangs in sweeping romantic garlands, giving these trees a striking magnificent appearance. Spanish moss is often referred to as an “air plant” since it seems to have no root system.

An icon in American history and literature, live oaks thrive in the south, and are the preferred landscaping tree for many homes and businesses. The live oak’s broad crown, with its long arching limbs that spread horizontally rather than vertically give this tree a distinctive architectural appeal many admire. The live oak’s deep root system and strong stature help it to withstand the high winds that topple many other trees during hurricane season.

When most people think of the South, they immediately think of these wonderful massive live oaks festooned with Spanish moss. During much of the south’s history, live oak trees were considered to be landmarks where people gathered to socialize or conduct business from day to day. In the opening scene of the famous film “Gone with the Wind,” Scarlett O’Hara is seen flirting with bachelors under live oaks at a barbecue party.

Live Oaks have made the most perfect additions to quality homes, residential communities, golf courses, industrial and commercial parks, city beautification projects and much more. Live oak trees have even been used to commemorate special events and occasions. An amazingly durable American native the Live Oak tree can measure its lifetime in centuries if properly located and cared for in the landscape.

The Live Oak is also one of the broadest spreading of the Oaks, providing large areas of deep, inviting summertime shade. Reaching 40 to 60 feet in height with a 60 to 100 foot spread and usually possessing many sinuously curved trunks and branches. A Live Oak tree is an impressive sight for any large-scale landscape. If you are looking for a majestic landscaping tree, you will find no other with the history and strength of a live oak tree.

A Perfect Landscape – The Live Oak Tree

A Perfect Landscape – The Live Oak Tree

If you live in the southern half of the United States of America there are few ways to spruce up a newer or an older property using mature live oaks as a landscaping tree. Live oak trees can add so much more grandeur to your home or business than many other trees. In fact the live oak tree can even add to the value of your property if the time comes to place it on the market.

While there are certainly many different types of trees you could choose from when you are shopping for a landscaping tree, there are none that compare to the strength, majesty and history of a live oak. The best place to start looking for your perfect mature live oak is on the internet. Most growers have detailed websites with photographs that show the health of the trees in their nursery.

In addition to the wealth of information on live oak trees online, you can find wholesale nursery companies. These companies can offer you prices that could save you hundreds of dollars when you buy directly from them. Most of these companies will be happy to help you through the entire process of your purchase from buying, to transporting, and even assist you in finding landscapers to plant your tree, then of course instructions on care for your tree.

You may not realize that live oaks come in many shapes and sizes which have been grown to suit specific individual tastes in landscaping design. The “Cathedral Live Oak” is also a cultivar live oak tree that grows tall, yet dense and round. Because it’s a cultivar, consistency is the key. The “High-rise Live Oak” is a cultivar live oak tree that grows tall and majestic, sturdy and beautiful while requiring less width in the landscape than a standard live oak. Finally, the traditional standard field-grown seedling live oak tree has its own shape and character, each one a magnificent, strong resilient live oak tree.

Beautiful mature trees can change the look and atmosphere of your home or business property. With such majestic trees you will find it is easier to give your home or business an elegant feel. It is a simple fact that trees are also much easier to deal with than most flowers or other types of plants.

There is almost literally no maintenance for most trees and what maintenance you do have is limited and quickly taken care of. The live oak tree lives for many hundreds of years, is green year-round in the southern U.S., and is considered by many to be a sturdy yet romantic tree. This is simply the perfect landscaping tree for any home or business including yours!

Live Oak Trees Commemorate Special Events And Guests

Live Oak Trees Commemorate Special Events And Guests

According to the Sea Island Company (seaisland.com), planting live oak trees has become a meaningful way for visitors to commemorate special events as well as mark the visit of honored guests to Sea Island ever since the visit of President Calvin Coolidge in 1928. The live oak has been claimed as the state tree of Georgia, and is considered a symbol of majesty and strength. The following documents those famous visits:

President Calvin Coolidge – December 1928

President Calvin Coolidge planted the first commemorative oak during the Christmas holidays shortly after “The Cloister” opened its doors. President and Mrs. Coolidge were visiting Sea Island Company founder Howard Coffin at his home on Sapelo Island.

President Dwight Eisenhower – May 1946

This oak was planted after President Eisenhower was elected, in honor of the visit he and Mrs. Eisenhower made to Sea Island in 1946.

Queen Juliana of the Netherlands and Prince Bernhard – April 1952

Queen Juliana and her husband Prince Bernhard spent Easter weekend on Sea Island and added an oak to the grounds. During their visit, the royal couple was attending as honored guests at an oyster roast hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Jones, Sr., at Altama Plantation.

President Gerald Ford – December 9, 1979

After his term of office, President Ford planted a commemorative oak while visiting as a guest of honor at a meeting and golf tournament at Sea Island.

President Jimmy Carter – July 28, 1981

President Carter assembled his first cabinet at The Cloister shortly after being elected in 1976. Accompanied by Mrs. Carter, he returned to plant an oak in July 1981.

Eugene O’Neill – May 12, 1988

A live oak was planted by Connecticut College, New London, Conn., to commemorate the playwright’s 100th birthday. O’Neill, who spent his youth in New London, lived on Sea Island from 1931 to 1936 in the cottage he and his wife, Carlotta Monterey, built and named Casa Genotta. O’Neill wrote his only comedy, “Ah, Wilderness!” on Sea Island; with it, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1936.

President George H.W. Bush – September 29, 1991

President Bush planted a commemorative oak while he and Mrs. Bush were vacationing in 1991 at “The Cloister”, site of their 1945 honeymoon. They also visited in January 1995, to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. During that visit, President Bush played the opening round at Ocean Forest Golf Club. The former president returned in August 2001 to open the 38th Walker Cup Match at Ocean Forest.

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher – April 1994

The former British prime minister has been called the most enthusiastic planter at Sea Island. Most honorees sprinkle a ceremonial shovel full of dirt; Mrs. Thatcher went around the tree shoveling the dirt, despite the fact she wore a pink suit. Her security guard was heard to say that Mrs. Thatcher would have packed down the dirt had she been wearing her gardening shoes.

President George W. Bush – June 7, 2004

President Bush hosted the G8 Summit, the most significant annual gathering of the eight leaders of the free world, on Sea Island from June 8-10, 2004. In the tradition of his father, he planted a commemorative oak close to his father’s.

Prime Minister Tony Blair – June 11, 2004

The British Prime Minister and his wife planted a commemorative oak during their visit for the G8 Summit.

The Sea Island Summit First Ladies – November 16, 2004

The Sea Island Gardening Group planted an oak to commemorate the visit to Sea Island by five of the First Ladies whose husbands participated in the G8 Summit. Those Ladies included Laura Bush of the United States, Cherie Blair of the United Kingdom, Bernadette Chirac of France, Sheila Martin of Canada, and Ludmilla Putin of the Russian Federation.

Additional live oaks on the grounds of The Cloister honor Georgia founder James Oglethorpe, the 50th anniversary of The Cloister, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Jones, Sr., and the Sea Island Employees in celebration of the 2000 Millennium. It is exciting to see the many ways live oak trees are used to mark momentous occasions, and this is just one example. These famous live oaks will be alive many generations from the day they were planted since some trees live hundreds of years or more.

Live Oak Trees: Weather Resistant and Virtually Perfect

Live Oak Trees: Weather Resistant and Virtually Perfect

Small town main streets across the southern US of A are where a lot of us call home. Even to those who are not from small towns still can look at picture or portrait of one and feel the love and homely feeling. Main streets all along the south are rippled gorgeous, picturesque, cathedral live oak trees. These trees as they grow seem to reach such great heights and then stretch out their branches as if they were holding hands. Like friends walking hand and hand down a country road. Live Oaks are some of the most weather resistant steadfast trees around. They really do stand up for the tests of time.

As many natural disasters’ have plagued the southern US, these beautiful trees withstand many of their warpaths. Like in 2004, Florida, the southern most state, had one of the worst hurricane seasons yet. Three major hurricanes hit the state almost back to back to back.

Author and landscape designer Pamela Crawford and researcher Barbara Hadsell researched and studied the damage state wide to see which tree/ s held up the best through the torturous weather conditions. The answer the came to was the Southern Live Oak tree. So many trees were either damaged or up rooted completely during the storms throughout the state that there was much information to be collected. Although thousands, if not more trees were damaged in the wake of the storms the live oak had stood strongest. Whether it be from there deeply rooted root systems, their well-balanced cathedral like branches and foliage or some other scientific fact, they stood this test of time, which Mother Nature had thrust upon them.

Live Oaks have always been known throughout history as a symbol of strength and longevity and during those storms, they said it louder. One might say these small town main streets scattered across the southern United States might have placed them along their streets and roadways as if to protect the small town charm held beneath. Maybe put there not only for their looks, their homely appeal, and inviting nature but as small a reminder that the south is strong. Since finding out all this information, I have started to wonder if these simple radiant trees are still standing tall today to almost mock at Mother Nature and tell her that they, the Southern Live Oak trees are way to strong for the wrath of even her.